Positive Behaviour Support



What is Positive Behaviour Support/Learning?

Chelsea Primary School has adopted a SWPBS framework. This is also known as Positive Behaviour Support or PBS. PBS involves the establishment of a Continuum of Behaviour Support that considers all students and emphasises prevention.

It is a proactive approach and focuses on teaching all students agreed expected behaviours and pro-social skills rather than reacting to inappropriate behaviour. This in turn creates a safer and more effective school environment.

The primary prevention aspect of PBS consists of values which are explicitly taught and modelled by school staff to encourage appropriate behaviour. Teaching behavioural expectations and acknowledging students for meeting them is a much more positive approach than waiting for misbehaviour to occur before responding.

Key components of PBS include:
  • An agreed upon common approach
  • Consistency of language
  • A matrix of positively stated expectations
  • Explicit teaching of expectations
  • Regular and frequent opportunities to practise expected behaviours
  • Recognition for meeting behavioural expectations
  • Students are acknowledged in a number of ways through stickers, postcards and acknowledgements.

PBS is not a program or a curriculum. It is a team based process for systemic problem solving, planning and evaluation. It is an approach to creating a safe and productive learning environment where teachers can teach and all students can learn.

Why focus on positive social behaviours?

In the past, school-wide discipline has focused mainly on reacting to specific student misbehaviour by implementing punishment- based strategies including reprimands, loss of privileges, office referrals, suspensions, and expulsions. Research has shown that the implementation of punishment, especially when it is used inconsistently and in the absence of other positive strategies is ineffective. Introducing, modelling and reinforcing positive social behaviour is an important aspect of a student’s educational experience. Teaching behavioural expectations and rewarding students for following them is a much more positive approach than waiting for misbehaviour to occur before responding. The purpose of school-wide PBS is to establish a climate in which appropriate behaviour is the norm.

I will leave you with one final example of what it means to be part of the School Wide Positive Behaviour
Support program:

“If a child doesn’t know how to read, we teach

“If a child doesn’t know how to write, we teach

“If a child doesn’t know how to swim, we teach

“If a child doesn’t know how to count, we teach

“If a child doesn’t know how to drive, we teach

“If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we teach? … we punish?

Finishing the last sentence does not come as automatically as it does the others (of which there could be hundreds of different contexts used). Unless you view children’s behaviour through the lens of a School Wide Positive Behaviour Support school, and then it does.





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